An analysis of walt whitmans live oak with moss

Whitman's "Live Oak with Moss" Alan Helms Almost forty years ago, while working on Whitman's manuscripts for the third edition of Leaves of Grass, Fredson Bowers discovered that twelve of the poems had originally formed a sequence entitled "Live Oak with Moss," which tells the story of Whitman's unhappy love affair with a man.

A reader unfamiliar with the sequence should turn to it now, at the end of this essay. Lines For all that, and though the live-oak glistens there in Louisiana solitary in a wide flat space, Uttering joyous leaves all its life without a friend a lover near, I know very well I could not.

Once convenient, Whitman begins to describe the many sensations associated with his love. In the next few years, the thy's and thou's Whitman banished from his early work begin to reappear, and before long this radically original poet becomes a largely conventional one, producing second-rate verse that wins him some of the popular audience he always longed for.

The retreat from his sexuality that follows the third edition thus has its counterpart in a degeneration of Whitman's style.

Origin, Growth, Meaning, immensely useful for its parallel texts of the and "Song of Myself. I throw myself upon your breast, my father, I cling to you so that you cannot unloose me, I hold you so firm, till you answer me something.

Being uninhibited by love, Whitman was robbed of all the subtile feelings which are associated with love. Martin is quite properly identified as "a pioneer in gay studies.

My Soul and I: It is amazing that a small thirteen line poem can verbalize so much. The capitol in fact occupies most of the poem in the form of Whitman's list of things he's renouncing, while the "One who loves me" the ostensible subject of the poem hardly appears.

As with the other poems I quote, I give the "Live Oak" poems in their first published form—that is, as they appeared in the third Leaves of Grass in in the form Whitman approved for publication. A Parallel Text A line like "What think you I take my pen in hand to record. In simple terms, I assumed that the poem was going to be about the observation of a tree in Louisiana.

I believe that Whitman is comparing the unexpected happenings of love to the abilities of the tree and life itself. Line 10 expands to twenty syllables, line 11 to twenty-five. Throughout the poem, Whitman incorporates an array of metaphors symbolic of love and the many characteristics associated with love.

Being uninhibited by love, Whitman was robbed of all the subtle feelings which are associated with love. But it is not. The reason our accounts differ so drastically is that we are describing journeys over radically different terrain, one of us reading the real "Live Oak, with Moss," the other reading the no-comma text constructed from "Calamus.

Norton and Company,I, 2,—2, The odd omission here is the lover himself think again of Shakespeare.

I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing Analysis

In "Calamus" the first "Live Oak" poem became Number 14, the second became 20, the third became 11, the fourth became 23, the fifth became 8, the sixth became 32, the seventh became 10, the eighth became 9, the ninth became 34, the tenth became 43, the eleventh became 36, and the last became An air of straightforward simplicity is suggested by the repeated use of the simple past tense in the early lines of the poem.

In the third poem "When I heard at the close of the day"so apparently cheerful, Helms found lurking a perturbing "transgression" that had driven the poet to his "retreat" into "conventional homosexual fantasy" in the fourth poem "This moment as I sit alone" pp.

The speaker then proceeds to wonder how the tree is able to expel such beauty all alone without the help of a friend or lover. Is there even one other like me—distracted—his friend, his lover, lost to him. Happy, loving, and open-minded, the love emanating from Whitman is a sign of true life.

In these hours, does he see the face of his hours reflected. Whitman's attention is so troubled by thoughts of what he dare and dare not do that he sometimes seems oblivious to what he's up against, as in "Calamus". Essay: Walt Whitman’s Live Oak, With Moss. Walt Whitman’s Live Oak, With Moss, is an intricate portrayal of love, both physical and mental.

Throughout the poem, Whitman incorporates an array of metaphors symbolic of love and the many characteristics associated with love. An analysis of the poem, “Live Oak, With Moss” by American poet, Walt Whitman.

I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing Analysis

“Live Oak, With Moss” Walt Whitman1s Live Oak, With Moss, is an intricate portrayal of love, both physical and mental. Live Oak, with Moss. I. Not the heat flames up and consumes, Not the sea-waves hurry in and out, Not the air, delicious and dry, the air of the ripe summer, bears lightly along white down-balls of myriads of seeds, wafted, sailing gracefully, to drop.

Live Oak, with Moss An electronic version of this text is available at The Walt Whitman Archive, an electronic scholarly edition of works by Walt Whitman. It is free and open to the public. What with Martin's endorsement and Stonum's affidavit in American Literary Scholarshipthe world has been guaranteed that Whitman's original "Live Oak, with Moss" sequence is conveniently and faithfully printed in The Continuing Presence of Walt Whitman.

But it is not.

The Walt Whitman Archive

I Saw in Louisiana a Live Oak Growing does not appear to have any rhythmic pattern. I did notice that the poet repeats certain phrases and lines throughout the poem. For example, in lines 3 and 12, Whitman writes “uttering Joyous leaves”.

“Live Oak, With Moss” An analysis of walt whitmans live oak with moss
Rated 3/5 based on 87 review
Essay: Walt Whitman’s Live Oak, With Moss